Learning Continuity and Attendance
Plan (2020–21)

Local Educational Agency (LEA) Name Contact Name and Title Email and Phone
Garden Grove Unified School District Gabriela Mafi, Ed.D.
Superintendent
gmafi@gguds.us
714-663-6111

General Information

[A description of the impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the LEA and its community.]

On Thursday, March 12, 2020, as a result of the public health crisis caused by COVID-19, the State of California issued a directive for the cessation of all non-essential public gatherings, not inclusive of classroom instruction. The next day, Friday, March 13th, the Governor issued Executive Order N-26-20, allowing schools to retain funding if districts:

  • Continue delivering high-quality educational opportunities to students through other options, distance learning and independent study;
  • Safely provide school meals through the Summer Food Service Program and Seamless Summer Option, consistent with the requirements of the California Department of Education and U.S. Department of Agriculture;
  • To the extent practicable, arrange for supervision for students during ordinary school hours;
  • Continue to pay employees.

Several large urban districts announced they would be ceasing in-person classes to allow for social distancing. The Garden Grove Unified School District Board of Education met on Friday, March 13th and the outcome was the suspension of in-person classes through April 13th. School staff came together on Monday, March 16th to determine plans for distance education and each employee submitted an individual work from home plan. By the end of the first week, all school site employees were working from home along with most district employees.

Prior to suspension of in-person classes and during the first week of at-home learning, the district gathered and created resources for students and parents that would support distance learning. These resources were housed in one place on the district web page and parents were notified of them via Parent Square. The web address for these resources is: https://ggusd.us/covidresources.

On April 1st, Governor Newsom and State Superintendent Thurmond announced an expectation that distance learning continue through the end of the 2019-2020 school year as part of the statewide effort to flatten the curve and reduce the spread of COVID-19. The Orange County Department of Education then issued its own recommendation that Orange County schools should cancel in-person classes through the remainder of the school year. As might be expected, most districts began to announce that distance learning would extend for the remainder of the school year. Thus, in keeping with districts in the county and across the state, GGUSD has also extended distance learning through June 12; in-person classes will not resume before the end of the school year.

While the Governor and State Department of Education have indicated that it is likely that students will return to school in the Fall, they have also advised us that, depending on the status of the pandemic, that return might be markedly different than typical school practices. Exactly what that means is still being determined. At present, we are looking into all of the possible aspects of a return, contingent on state and county directives in relation to COVID-19, and will be sharing that information with all stakeholders as it becomes available.

As our nation and community confront the challenges presented by COVID-19, school and district leaders in GGUSD have been working diligently to create a school reopening plan that will meet the educational needs of our community and adhere to county and state health guidelines published in June.

On July 17, the state and Governor updated direction for school reopening, indicating that school districts cannot open for in-person instruction until their respective counties remain off of the state’s monitoring list for rising COVID-19 infections for 14 consecutive days. Monday, August 24th is the scheduled first day of classes in GGUSD. With Orange County currently on the monitoring list and with the recent surge of coronavirus cases, according to state guidelines, we must begin the 2020-2021 school year with online instruction only. The superintendent and district leaders have been planning for this contingency and are prepared to pivot entirely to online-only distance learning.

The Board and district leadership team understand that for many of our families – distance learning is not easy – with challenges like childcare, work schedules, and access to technology. There is absolutely no replacement for the classroom experience where teachers are face to face with students, ensuring that their unique learning needs are met through tried and true instructional strategies. Rest assured, district leaders are working around the clock to ensure that distance learning will look and feel different than it did in the spring when COVID-19 first shuttered our schools.

We cannot predict when COVID-19 conditions will improve in Orange County, but we are committed to keeping our community informed every step of the way. We will re-survey families and staff about reopening again once the county is off of the monitoring list for the required 14 days.

Once we are clear to re-open for the 2020-2021 school year and through the span of the COVID-19 pandemic, GGUSD will offer three learning options:

  1. Students attend in-person class (all or some of the day/week, depending on each site’s capacity and ability to implement given required physical distancing);
  2. A hybrid model of some in-person class and distance learning;
  3. A Virtual Academy which will include online learning led by a teacher through virtual lessons with opportunities for tutoring on campus if needed.

GGUSD’s reopening plans are based on health and safety guidelines from the Orange County Health Care Agency and the California Department of Public Health as well as the Orange County Department of Education and California Department of Education. Guidance may change based on the status of the pandemic and GGUSD will remain flexible. If at any time after reopening, the county or state COVID-19 conditions call for another cancellation of in-person classes and return to distance learning for all, we will be prepared to do so.

GGUSD’s reopening plans were developed with feedback from those we serve, including nearly 30,000 family surveys, 2,100 employee surveys, and feedback from our stakeholder task force which met throughout June and July and included nearly 200 students, parents, and staff members. We realize that in a district of 41,000 students and 67 schools, we serve a diverse community with a wide range of needs. There is no one-size-fits all plan for our 67 schools and each school has developed a site specific reopening plan based on feedback from its own students, families, and staff.

Stakeholder Engagement

[A description of the efforts made to solicit stakeholder feedback.]

GGUSD’s reopening plans were developed with feedback from those we serve, including nearly 30,000 family surveys both electronically and paper copies, 2,100 employee surveys, and feedback from our stakeholder task force which met throughout June and July and included nearly 200 students, parents, board members, district cabinet, employee groups, and classified/certificated/ administrative staff members. Feedback from stakeholders determined our next steps in the reopening plan. Reopening task force met on June 30th, July 9th, July 13th, and July 15th to discuss the updates on the district and school plans of school reopening as well as providing input into developing reopening plans.

For nonrespondents of the survey, calls were made to reach out to these families for their input for what they prefer for the coming school year.

Surveys sent home included translated versions in different languages depending on the language needs of each family. Translated versions included Spanish, Vietnamese, and Korean.

We realize that in a district of 41,000 students and 67 schools, we serve a diverse community with a wide range of needs. There is no one-size-fits all plan for our 67 schools and each school has developed a site specific reopening plan based on feedback from its own students, families, and staff.

The Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) met via Zoom at 9:00am on August 10th for input, and the District English Learning Advisory Committee (DELAC) met via Zoom at 10:00am on August 10th for input.

Stakeholders were given weekly communication regarding reopening updates. Weekly reopening updates were sent to families via ParentSquare starting on June 19th, and employees were sent weekly employee FAQs from the Assistant Superintendent of Personnel starting in April 2020.

[A description of the options provided for remote participation in public meetings and public hearings.]

Stakeholder engagement was promoted through ParentSquare, district website, e-newspaper, social media, signs and marquees, and where needed, phone calls and emails.

When appropriate, the Zoom video conferencing platform has been used to facilitate meetings with stakeholders.

The district purchased an upgraded Zoom license with large participant capacity (3,000) in order to ensure that all those who wanted to participate could do so.

[A summary of the feedback provided by specific stakeholder groups.]

According to the results from the parent surveys:
Parents expressed diverse needs of mental and emotional concerns, child care due to work schedule, wanting to know the future to prepare for the expectations from the uncertainties, and support the most vulnerable students who will need to attend online learning for health concerns. 36% also expressed the need to receive a device from school to support learning from home, 26% expressed the needs for technical support/ training for students, 24% expressed the needs for technical support/training for parents, 21% expressed the needs for school materials, and 8% expressed the needs for Wifi installed at home.

If the district implements a hybrid schedule combing in person learning and online distance learning, about 44% of parents wanted school to be everyday, about 21% wanted to have 3-4 days a week with the remainder to be distance learning from home, about 12% wanted to have half day at school and half day distance learning at home all five days a week, about 15% wanted to alternate every other day learning at school and distance learning from home, about 10% wanted to attend school 1 day per week or 2 half days and distance learning the rest of the week, and about 16% wanted to have virtual school.

Parents have expressed that the most important factors for returning to school are enhanced cleaning, hand washing/sanitizer, checking for temperature and social distancing.

Staff surveys also revealed 3 top priorities such as having protocols in place for cases of COVID19 at work, enhanced cleaning, and regular hand washing and hand sanitizer.

Participants from the task force met and reviewed and discussed the school planning process as well as next steps for GGUSD.

Stakeholders requested specifics on expectations for distance learning, norms/expectations of teachers, more protocols if positive cases are present on campus, more socio-emotional/wellness supports, SPED (IEP's and instructional minutes), extra-curricular in all Educational Models, and sending out a new Parent Survey.

The task force also considered contingencies to prepare for all eventualities such as having in person classes, hybrid model, continued all distance learning, or reverting to all distance learning sometime after reopening.

[A description of the aspects of the Learning Continuity and Attendance Plan that were influenced by specific stakeholder input.]

District purchase and distribution of devices and mobile hotspots.

Options for returning to school, specifically the addition of a Virtual Learning Academy for families who do not want their children to return to school when the transition back to in-person instruction takes place.

Contingency plans for all eventualities for in person classes, online only, hybrid model, or reverting from one model to another after reopening. This includes consideration for capacity, schedule and plan, and curriculum and instruction for both elementary and secondary levels.

Acquisition and incorporation of professionally developed supplemental learning platforms to assist students during asynchronous learning time (eg. Seesaw, Edgenuity, ABC Mouse).

Providing child care (infant, toddler, TK-6) for parents who are essential workers, principally directed to support low-income families in the community. The district has received approval from the Orange County Health Care Agency to offer child care up through the 6th grade. The district is currently working with several designated sites to develop plans for safely providing these services.

Continuity of Learning

In-Person Instructional Offerings

[A description of the actions the LEA will take to offer classroom-based instruction whenever possible, particularly for students who have experienced significant learning loss due to school closures in the 2019–2020 school year or are at a greater risk of experiencing learning loss due to future school closures.]

The health and safety of our students, families, and staff is our highest priority. Once we are cleared to resume in-person classes GGUSD will adhere to county and state safety guidelines. Safety protocols may change based on the current status of the pandemic and the guidance issued by health authorities.

The hours and days that students can attend will vary by school and level to adhere to physical distancing requirements in the classroom as the district must ensure that all students on campus have supervision.

School-specific schedules for both distance and hybrid learning meeting district guidelines and considering data collected from community and staff surveys have been developed at each site in grade-level/department spans. These plans delineate synchronous and asynchronous instruction blocks as well as time for additional student support (eg. tutorials and extended learning opportunities). Sample hybrid schedules are below, sample distance learning schedules are in the "Distance Learning" section of this plan:

Sample K-6 (2nd and 3rd grade) hybrid schedule:

Synchronous instruction will take place in two blocks of time (AM/PM). All students will have teacher time daily. AM group will have synchronous instruction then grab and go lunch to go home. PM group will eat outdoors while being supervised, before going to class for synchronous instruction. Wednesday schedule will accommodate both groups on campus.

AM: (Cohort B) 8:00-10:40 AM synchronous instruction. 10:40 AM grab and go lunch.

PM: (Cohort C) 11:20-11:40 AM supervised lunch. 11:40 - 2:20 PM synchronous instruction.

*Cohort A attends class 5 days per week and consists of students in special populations

**On Wednesdays when all cohorts are on campus some students will receive synchronous instruction with the teacher while others will engage in small group activities with partner teachers or instructional aides. Students will rotate groups between whole class and small group.

***When all cohorts are on campus, recess will be staggered with identified and marked zones for each grade level.


Sample 7-8 (Intermediate) hybrid schedule: (Intermediate) hybrid schedule:

Monday: Cohort A attends block schedule periods 1, 3, 5 for synchronous learning. Grab and go lunch after period 5, then students return home for asynchronous learning, and extended learning after the regular school day as necessary and appropriate.

Tuesday: Cohort B attends block schedule periods 1, 3, 5 for synchronous learning. Grab and go lunch after period 5, then students return home for asynchronous learning, and extended learning after the regular school day as necessary and appropriate.

Wednesday: Cohorts A and B together participate in online synchronous instruction, all class periods 1-6. Wednesday is early release allowing teachers to have collaborative planning time built into the school day. Extended learning continues on Wednesday after teachers collaboration time.

Thursday: Cohort A attends block schedule periods 2, 4, 6 for synchronous learning. Grab and go lunch after period 6, then students return home for asynchronous learning, and extended learning after the regular school day as necessary and appropriate.

Friday: Cohort B attends attends block schedule periods 2, 4, 6 for synchronous learning. Grab and go lunch after period 6, then students return home for asynchronous learning, and extended learning after the regular school day as necessary and appropriate.

*Cohort C consists of students with special needs and English Language Learner newcomers and ELD A. Cohort C attends on-campus synchronous learning all five days of the week.**When students in Cohorts A and B are not on campus for synchronous learning they are completing asynchronous work at home.

***Hand sanitizing will take place during passing periods.


Sample 9-12 (High School) hybrid schedule:

Monday: Cohort A attends block schedule periods 1, 2, and 3 for synchronous learning (75 minutes). Grab and go lunch after period 3. Cohort B attends shorter periods (35 minutes) after lunch for synchronous instruction.

Tuesday: Cohort B attends block schedule periods 1,2, and 3 for synchronous learning (75 minutes). Grab and go lunch after period 3. Cohort A attends shorter periods (35 minutes after lunch for synchronous instruction.

Wednesday: All class periods meet virtually in synchronous instruction with each class period shorter (40 minutes) to accommodate teacher collaboration during the school day.

Thursday: Cohort A attends block schedule periods 4, 5, and 6 for synchronous learning (75 minutes). Grab and go lunch after period 6. Cohort B attends shorter periods (35 minutes) after lunch for synchronous instruction.

Friday: Cohort B attends block schedule periods 4, 5, and 6 for synchronous learning (75 minutes). Grab and go lunch after period 6. Cohort A attends shorter periods (35 minutes) after lunch for synchronous instruction.

*Cohort C consists of students with special needs and English Language Learner newcomers and ELD A. Cohort C attends on-campus synchronous learning all five days of the week.**When students in Cohorts A and B are not on campus for synchronous learning they are completing asynchronous work at home.

***Hand sanitizing will take place during passing periods.


With a commitment to equity, our goal is to ensure each school is meeting the educational needs of their families and their community. Administrators from each of GGUSD’s 67 schools developed a school reopening plan using site-specific survey results and classroom/building capacity. Each administrator analyzed classroom space capacity (removing unnecessary furniture and ensuring six feet between desks) to determine the percentage of students that can safely learn in each classroom as well as the needs for alternative learning spaces and supervision when students are not in the classroom.

Each student and staff will be given 2 masks and 1 face shield to help protect themselves in enclosed space while maintaining 6ft apart.

Hand sanitizer stations and disinfectant spray will be available for staff and students.

Hygiene: New hand-washing protocols will be established to ensure students and staff have multiple opportunities to wash their hands throughout the day. Every classroom without a sink will be provided with hand sanitizer. All sinks will have signage to remind students/staff about proper hand washing.

Campus and Classroom Cleaning: Following CDC guidelines, a daily disinfecting and cleaning schedule will be in place for regular and frequent cleaning of common touch points, (desks, seats, devices, door knobs, etc.) based on clearly articulated standards of cleanliness, with a system for verifying sanitized areas through cleaning logs. Playground equipment will be regularly cleaned and student use will be limited. Custodians will follow Cal/OSHA requirements including proper ventilation during cleaning and disinfecting.

Sharing of devices, books, instruments, and other items will be restricted whenever possible.

Food Services: Each school will implement a plan to limit physical interaction during meal preparation and service. Buffets and share tables will be suspended. Pre-wrapped grab-and-go meals will be distributed to students attending each school. If student is not present, student ID must be provided.

Transportation: Bus drivers and students will be required to wear face coverings. Students will sit one student per seat per row and every other seat when possible. Students will board the bus one at a time, filling the bus from back to front. Bus windows will be opened when possible to circulate fresh air. Buses will be cleaned and disinfected daily including seats and other frequently touched surfaces.

Ventilation: To ensure proper ventilation, classroom doors will be open when practicable. HVAC filters will be CDC compliant and replaced regularly. HVAC systems are being adjusted to increase intake/circulation of fresh air.

Response to Illness: Individuals who present symptoms of COVID-19 will be isolated, sent home, and contact tracing protocols will be enacted under the direction of the Orange County Health Care Agency. The district has created and disseminated a detailed plan for identifying and addressing varying scenarios of exposure and symptomatic staff and students.

Teachers have created online classrooms for students using Google Classroom (this learning management system will be used for both hybrid and on-line instruction to ensure consistency and continuity). Younger students may have a simpler learning space set up for them to interact with their teacher through the Seesaw app or web portal. In addition, teachers are using the online meeting tools Zoom and Google Meet to conduct live face-to-face lessons with students as well as hold office hours for students to receive extra help. The district has upgraded all teacher Zoom accounts to Premium in order to have access to all interactive features.

All core classes will continue to use district-approved curriculum and textbooks in both distance and hybrid learning. All classes will continue to follow district pacing guides, with time modifications made when necessary and appropriate.

Students in all core classes will continue to have on-line versions of the textbook, along with publisher platforms that include videos, interactive activities, simulations, and formative assessments.

In addition to course pacing guides, all core classes have Distance/Hybrid Learning Pacing Addenda to be used until students return to 100% in-person instruction. The addenda include a variety of resources specifically designed to support distance and hybrid learning and are delineated by synchronous and asynchronous instruction. These resources have been curated and vetted by the district Instruction Offices.

Teachers will use Google Classroom to post assignments, provide directions, communicate with students about classwork and homework, and provide links to additional support resources (eg. Khan Academy). Google Classroom will be used in both hybrid and distance learning to ensure consistency and continuity.

In addition to core curriculum, teachers and students at the K-6 level will have access to the Seesaw app, an online learning journal where students and teachers post materials, conduct learning activities, and have on-going communication. In hybrid learning Seesaw will be utilized during asynchronous learning to support what has been taught during synchronous instruction.

At the 7-12 level teachers and students will use Edgenuity as a supplement to support additional opportunities to interact with curriculum. In hybrid learning Edgenuity will be utilized during asynchronous learning to support what has been taught during synchronous instruction.

Teachers and school sites will continue to incorporate MTSS (Multi-Tiered System of Supports) during in-person learning.

  • Universal supports - good best first instruction: Effective Instruction, Constructing Meaning, Thinking Maps, etc - must be providedfor ALL students
  • Supplemental support - small group instruction, reteaching - may need to be provided for SOME students at various times
  • Intensified support - remediation of foundational skills - may be needed for a FEW students some of the time to be successful in themost inclusive and equitable learning environment of their grade level peers.

The district will be using FastBridge software to support MTSS. FastBridge uses formative assessment data to identify and assign proven interventions for students needing additional levels of support. FastBridge offers tailored reading, math and social-emotional intervention activities to target specific knowledge and skills gaps identified.

Parents and students will continue to be able to access grades and student progress using Aeries Parent/Student Portal.

Teachers will continue to have access to Parent Square, the district platform that allows teachers to send students and parents direct messages, e-mail, and text messages. In addition, teachers will be able to use Class Dojo, an additional communication portal with parents to increase communication and community building

GGUSD has prioritized our students’ social emotional well-being by implementing a “Start Strong” initiative district wide to deliver numerous social emotional lessons and supports to students at all grade levels, across all classrooms. A GGUSD team of school psychologists, counselors, social workers, nurses, and instructional leaders has developed learning modules and resources to support student well-being during the first two weeks of school. “Start Strong” learning modules will empower students with tools to overcome emotional hardships and barriers to learning, working to establish a safe and supportive learning environment that promotes social emotional learning. The first two weeks of school will focus heavily on supporting school connectedness and student wellness, with the goal of continuing to integrate social-emotional learning throughout the school year.

Actions Related to In-Person Instructional Offerings

[additional rows and actions may be added as necessary]

Description
Total Funds
Contributing

Purchase of personal protective equipment such as face masks and shields, plexiglass dividers, hand sanitizer and dispensers, paper towels, disinfectant wipes/spray, gloves, plastic barriers, signage, and parking cones as well as portable handwashing stations.

$3,000,000
No

Purchase of additional instructional materials and supplies to accommodate social distancing, students not having to share items, and the ability to sanitize items before and after classes (eg. calculators, compasses, rulers, student whiteboards and pens, etc.)

$4,726,535
No

Purchase of additional non-instructional/recess materials and supplies to accommodate social distancing, students not having to share items, and the ability to sanitize items before and after recess (eg. board games, balls, recess equipment, etc.) as well as purchase shade structures and outdoor tables/seating for schools for student use.

$7,100,000
No

Purchase of additional student furniture (eg. modified desks and chairs) to ensure compliance with social distancing protocol as well as the purchase of storage containers to house supplies and equipment to ensure adequate spacing in the classroom for social distancing protocols.

$5,000,000
No

Purchase more efficient air conditioning filters ensure our schools' HVAC system is up to code and correctly maintained as well as needed extra duty hours of HVAC Technicians and maintenance employees.

$2,500,000
No

Distance Learning Program

Continuity of Instruction

[A description of how the LEA will provide continuity of instruction during the school year to ensure pupils have access to a full curriculum of substantially similar quality regardless of the method of delivery, including the LEA’s plan for curriculum and instructional resources that will ensure instructional continuity for pupils if a transition between in-person instruction and distance learning is necessary.]

School-specific schedules for both distance and hybrid learning meeting district guidelines and considering data collected from community and staff surveys, have been developed at each site in grade-level/department spans. These plans delineate synchronous and asynchronous instruction blocks as well as time for additional student support (eg. tutorials and extended learning opportunities).

Both Distance Learning and hybrid schedules meet or exceed all instructional minute requirements for all courses.

Students will meet with their assigned teachers daily at the K-6 level and daily or every other day at the 7-12 level in synchronous instruction.

Sample TK-6 schedule.

Students will engage in:

110-170 minutes of live interaction with teachers daily, including:

  • Daily morning and closure meetings for wellness check-in and overview of the day
  • Two daily 30 minute lessons in ELA and Math
  • Twice-weekly 20-minute small group sessions
  • Daily 30 minute ELD lesson, if necessary

140 - 200 minutes of independent work daily, including:

  • 20 minutes of reading daily
  • 20 minutes of daily math practice

100-140 minutes of asynchronous learning activities, including independent follow-up work and use of supplemental interactive educational software

  • At least 20 minutes of movement and exercise daily (Go Noodle)
  • Ability to reach teacher virtually during office hours
  • Additional intervention support provided by aide or specialist based on individual need

In 7-12: all teachers will adhere to the instructional schedule provided by the administrator and will engage students in synchronous and asynchronous instruction daily. Each school will be in a block schedule where students will attend 3 periods a day in Synchronous instruction and in the afternoon participate in asynchronous instruction in preview, review, break out and small group instruction with their teacher(s). Each school schedule will reflect the required instructional minutes. DIS providers will be expected to provide synchronous and asynchronous services per students’ IEP.

Teachers have created online classrooms for students using Google Classroom. Younger students may have a simpler learning space set up for them to interact with their teacher through the Seesaw app or web portal. In addition, teachers are using the online meeting tools, Zoom and Google Meet, to conduct live face-to-face lessons with students as well as hold office hours for students to receive extra help.

Teachers will meet with their students via video conferencing using either Zoom or Google Meet. Zoom and Google Meet are platforms that allow teachers to conduct real-time online video meetings with students and parents for activities such as teaching a lesson or conducting a parent meeting regarding student progress. Provides opportunity for grouping via breakout rooms.

In addition to video conferencing programs, teachers will utilize district-approved software and apps to support student learning (eg. EdPuzzle, Explain Everything, Go Guardian, Kami, Nearpod, Padlet, PearDeck, Screencastify, Kahoot, etc.). In addition, at the K-6 level teachers and students will have access to ABC Mouse, a platform that allows teachers to create a learning path for students using engaging, interactive online activities within their virtual classroom.

All core classes will continue to use district-approved curriculum and textbooks in both distance and hybrid learning.

All classes will continue to follow district pacing guides, with time modifications made when necessary and appropriate.

All core classes have on-line versions of the textbook, along with publisher platforms that include videos, interactive activities, simulations, and formative assessments.

In addition to course pacing guides, all core classes have Distance Learning Pacing Addenda to be used until students return to 100% in-person instruction. The addenda include a variety of resources specifically designed to support distance learning and are delineated by synchronous and asynchronous instruction. These resources have been curated and vetted by the district Instruction Offices.

Teachers will use Google Classroom to post assignments, provide directions, communicate with students about classwork and homework, and provide links to additional support resources (eg. Khan Academy).

In addition to core curriculum, teachers and students at the K-6 level will have access to the Seesaw app, an online learning journal where students and teachers post materials, conduct learning activities, and have on-going communication.

At the 7-12 level teachers and students will use Edgenuity as a supplement to support additional opportunities to interact with curriculum.

    Teachers and school sites will continue to incorporate MTSS (Multi-Tiered System of Supports) during distance learning.
  • Universal supports - good best first instruction: Effective Instruction, Constructing Meaning, Thinking Maps, etc - must be providedfor ALL students
  • Supplemental support - small group instruction, reteaching - may need to be provided for SOME students at various times
  • Intensified support - remediation of foundational skills - may be needed for a FEW students some of the time to be successful in themost inclusive and equitable learning environment of their grade level peers.

The district will be using FastBridge software to support MTSS. FastBridge uses formative assessment data to identify and assign proven interventions for students needing additional levels of support. FastBridge offers tailored reading, math and social-emotional intervention activities to target specific knowledge and skills gaps identified.

Parents and students will continue to be able to access grades and student progress using Aeries Parent/Student Portal.

Teachers will continue to have access to Parent Square, the district platform that allows teachers to send students and parents direct messages, e-mail, and text messages. In addition, teachers will be able to use Class Dojo, an additional communication portal with parents to increase communication and community building

GGUSD has prioritized our students’ social emotional well-being by implementing a “Start Strong” initiative district wide to deliver numerous social emotional lessons and supports to students at all grade levels, across all classrooms. A GGUSD team of school psychologists, counselors, social workers, nurses, and instructional leaders has developed learning modules and resources to support student well-being during the first two weeks of school. “Start Strong” learning modules will empower students with tools to overcome emotional hardships and barriers to learning, working to establish a safe and supportive learning environment that promotes social emotional learning. The first two weeks of school will focus heavily on supporting school connectedness and student wellness, with the goal of continuing to integrate social-emotional learning throughout the school year.

Access to Devices and Connectivity

[A description of how the LEA will ensure access to devices and connectivity for all pupils to support distance learning.]

The district distributed a family survey with the intent to collect data on learning environment preferences and device/connectivity needs. Parents were able to identify if they needed a device checked out, a wi-fi hotspot, and/or technical assistance in getting the device connected to the Internet and how to use the device.

Any and all students can check out a device from their home school site for completing class assignments and for staying in communication with teachers and school staff. Since closure back in March, schools have distributed over 15,000 devices to students and will be continuing to distribute them for students throughout the closure.

Plans for return, repair, replacement and sterilization of devices including specialized equipment sent home for special education students have been developed.

Students in need of Internet can check out a hot spot from the district office or from their home school site.

Technology Support Specialists are available to assist students and families with technology support. The process for contacting the specialists has been published on the district website and has been sent to all families via Parent Square (the district adopted communication app).

Wellness calls are made by school site staff when students are not logging onto classes (Zoom or Google-Meet) and/or completing assignments.

For students with unique needs (eg. Moderate/Severe, visually impaired) classroom teachers are working with site administration and Technology Support Specialists to identify and address targeted technology needs. In some instances, classroom aides have worked individually with students and parents to problem solve and develop student confidence.

Pupil Participation and Progress

[A description of how the LEA will assess pupil progress through live contacts and synchronous instructional minutes, and a description of how the LEA will measure participation and time value of pupil work.]

Teachers will be able to use the "participants" feature on Zoom and Google Meet to keep track of which students are attending synchronous sessions. Both platforms maintain a record of session participants.

All teachers will continue to take daily attendance on the Aeries platform.

Teachers will use multiple measures during synchronous and asynchronous instruction time to monitor student engagement and progress. Examples include checking for understanding apps during synchronous instruction (eg. Kahoot, Padlet, PearDeck), assessments included with publisher platforms that allow for real-time correction and feedback, and summative assessments that determine student mastery.

Wellness calls will be made by teachers and/or other school site staff to gain an understanding of student progress.

Teachers will continue to use formative and summative assessments, both publisher provided and teacher/department created.

Teachers will continue to collaborate to develop course-alike assessments and projects, along with scoring guides and rubrics.

For all students with an IEP or a 504 Plan, teachers and/or case managers will document student participation and engagement.

For students with an IEP or a 504 Plan, teachers and/or case managers will document all attempts to communicate with students and parents who may not be participating in distance learning.

Special education teachers / service providers will document all services provided and attempted for students with an IEP.

In the case of Independent Study, EC Section 51747.5(b) and 5 CCR 11703(b)(4) provide that the time value of a student’s work is personally judged by a certificated teacher. Using those sections as a guide for asynchronous assignments, while in distance learning each teacher will determine the scope and duration of individual assignments, balancing that the work is being accomplished at home away from direct support with the need to provide timely feedback to students (and parents) so that they may adjust their learning strategies as needed. That being said, each assignment will have a completion date and teachers will continue to adhere to the district policy for posting student work (Parent and Student Portal).

Distance Learning Professional Development

[A description of the professional development and resources that will be provided to staff to support the distance learning program, including technological support.]

All district employees will complete mandated COVID-19 online trainings as required by the CDC, state, and county.

The Garden Grove Unified Super Week (4 days of professional development prior to teachers' first day of reporting to work) included over 200 workshops that incorporated distance learning strategies and supports to meet the needs of all teachers, including both academic and socio-emotional courses.

Ongoing and after-school professional development courses will be offered throughout the school year to continue to help support teachers with distance learning and hybrid instruction - focusing both on instructional strategies and content. Workshops and webinars will be developed based on teacher feedback as well as administrator identified needs.

The K-6 and 7-12 Instruction Departments will continue to provide professional development in the areas of content, instructional strategies, support for English Learners and Students with Disabilities, as well as instructional design. Professional development on District initiatives (eg. Effective Instruction, Constructing Meaning, Systematic ELD) will not cease during hybrid/distance learning.

Department chairs and grade-level chairs will continue to meet monthly and receive targeted content-specific professional development that they can take back to their school sites and replicate.

The GGUSD Instructional Technology Department will continue to provide a series of trainings and webinars to support teachers' use of digital tools, highlighting best practices for increasing student motivation, student engagement, monitoring student progress, and delivery of content.

The Instructional Technology Department will work with site Technology Coordinators to provide site-based assistance and support for teachers.

Each site has an assigned Teacher on Special Assignment (TOSA) to help develop and deliver site-specific professional development opportunities to best meet the needs of teachers at that site.

Both hybrid and distance learning schedules continue to include time built into the school week for teachers to collaborate in grade-level, course-alike and department teams to co-plan, share best practices and activities, develop materials and resources, and problem-solve.

Staff Roles and Responsibilities

[A description of the new roles and responsibilities of affected staff as a result of COVID-19.]

Teachers will be providing instruction via video-conferencing platforms (Zoom, Google Meet). Providing instruction in this way will be new for many teachers therefore the district will provide professional development on how to use the technology, as well as best practices for managing and engaging students in this type of learning.

Administrators will provide information, instructional guidance and support during weekly staff meetings, respond to emails in a timely manner and conduct frequent check-ins of staff and community, monitor lessons on essential learning and grading, communicating with parents regarding student participation and check in with teachers regularly.

Counselors, Psychologist, Social Worker, Speech Language Pathologists will support students' and families' social emotional needs, conduct wellness checks with remote counseling via various online platforms, and provide services as noted in students' IEPs such as speech and language therapy.

School site classified personnel will assist putting together and sending out instructional packets and assist with all clerical support needs such as (but not limited to) writing letters to families and students with provided scripts.

Custodians/ maintenance staff will check in with site administrators, review equipments, review and planning work order as well as preventive maintenance, and participating in online trainings.

Food Service Workers will continue to provide meal service.

In instances where staff roles have been modified to meet distance learning needs, but those modifications are no longer necessary with a transition to hybrid learning, site and district administration will work with employee groups to determine suitable duties within an employees classification.

Supports for Pupils with Unique Needs

[A description of the additional supports the LEA will provide during distance learning to assist pupils with unique needs, including English learners, pupils with exceptional needs served across the full continuum of placements, pupils in foster care, and pupils who are experiencing homelessness.]

English Learners will continue to receive supports embedded into their courses with ongoing ELL strategies and scaffolds. Teachers will consider EL's language levels when designing lessons and monitor accordingly. Students will be provided multiple opportunities to engage in structured oral language practice and structured writing prompts with academic language and sentence frames.

Newcomers will continue to be assessed and placed in appropriate ELD classes.

At the K-6 level, designated ELD will be provided in synchronous instructional minutes and are included in every school's schedule. The schedule has been shared with every parent, and site principals will monitor implementation.

Additional supports for students who are English Learners, pupils with exceptional needs, students in foster care or experiencing homelessness will be provided, to include, but not limited to multiple opportunities daily for one-on-one and small group instruction with their teacher(s), and embedded intervention strategies.

Students with unique needs will also be provided reading, speaking, and writing scaffolds (eg. guided reading notes, language and writing support such as sentence frames and starters, structured language practice, and writing templates).

Instructional Assistants are available to support distance learning by engaging with students in break-out sessions, providing follow-up support in small groups, responding to individual questions on posts or via email.

IBI staff will be available to support student behaviors by participating in on-line learning activities. They can also reach out to families to provide strategies and support.

Where additional supports, instruction, or resources are needed, teachers can reach out to administration and counseling staff to request assistance.

For students with IEPs and 504 plan, accommodations and modifications will be provided via distance learning based on the individual plan. Teachers and or case managers will document student participation and engagement as well as attempts to communicate with students and parents who may not be participating in distance learning. Teachers and or case managers will also be monitoring students' access to goals and services will be provided and attempted by special education teachers/ service providers.

Teachers will consider key elements of differentiation when designing lessons and monitor accordingly when it comes to Depth, complexity, Novelty, Acceleration. Students with exceptional needs such as GATE will be provided multiple learning opportunities in various settings ranging from whole group to independent study. They will also be provided opportunities to demonstrate acquisition of new learning in various settings ranging from whole group to collaborative efforts and independent study dissemination.

Actions related to the Distance Learning Program

[additional rows and actions may be added as necessary]

Description
Total Funds
Contributing

Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs) in both K-6 and 7-12 worked during the summer to develop Pacing Addenda for all core classes. Addenda included specific resources and materials, delineated by synchronous and asynchronous, that teachers could use when lesson planning and providing instruction.

$250,000
No

TOSAs worked with personnel from the Department of Student Services during the summer to develop lessons and resources for the "Start Strong" initiative, as well as preparing and presenting a workshop rolling out the initiative. Start Strong is a district-wide initiative supporting students' social emotional well-being.

$25,000
No

Purchase of additional devices for student check out.

$7,840,000
Yes

Purchase of mobile hotspots for student/family check out as needed.

$1,700,000
Yes

Additional staffing for student registration and distribution of textbooks, devices, and school supplies

$300,000
No

Purchase of additional technology and devices for teachers and staff to facilitate distance learning, including I.T. infrastructure upgrades to support distance learning.

$4,000,000
No

Purchase of instructional software licensing for teachers and staff.

$2,500,000
No

Teacher training during Super Week, from August 14-19, to prepare for distance learning and instruction as well as on-going training throughout the school year.

$2,500,000
Yes

Staffing for the Virtual Learning Academy including teachers, administrators, and school community liaisons.

$1,750,000
No

Pupil Learning Loss

[A description of how the LEA will address pupil learning loss that results from COVID-19 during the 2019–2020 and 2020–21 school years, including how the LEA will assess pupils to measure learning status, particularly in the areas of English language arts, English language development, and mathematics.]

Without having access to the large-scale end of course summative assessments, California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), to determine which students, and by how much, failed to meet expected learning targets at the end of the 2019-2020 school year it will be imperative that classroom teachers conduct pre-assessments at the beginning of the 2020-2021 school year in each content area to establish not only baseline data but more importantly areas of learning gaps (whole class and individual students). In addition, it will be beneficial for teachers to continually administer pre-assessments as well as post-assessments and interim formative assessments throughout the school year to monitor student progress towards learning goals.

English Learners, those in ELD classes and those not, will be monitored for both content progress as well as academic language. Teachers will utilize classroom assessments to differentiate students' particular needs in order to provide the appropriate support and scaffolding.

Teachers in ELA and math have access to curriculum-embedded formative assessments which can be used to determine short-cycle progress and/or learning gaps - this data can be used to adjust instruction as needed and/or to provide targeted interventions.

Learning gaps, with respect to pre-requisite knowledge and skills, will need to be considered when teachers are lesson planning and in preparing and assigning outside of class interventions.

Teachers may utilize instructional aides to assist with small group interventions during both synchronous and asynchronous learning.

Teachers will have access to supplemental on-line learning platforms (eg. Seesaw, ABC Mouse, Edgenuity) as well as publicly available tutoring sites (eg. Khan Academy) to address specific learning gaps.

Office hours will be used for one on one support for students who struggle in ELA, ELD, and Mathematics.

Pupil Learning Loss Strategies

[A description of the actions and strategies the LEA will use to address learning loss and accelerate learning progress for pupils, as needed, including how these strategies differ for pupils who are English learners; low-income; foster youth; pupils with exceptional needs; and pupils experiencing homelessness.]

Students identified by the teacher as not possessing the pre-requisite knowledge or skills necessary to be successful with current classwork or not performing well on regular assessments will be provided additional instruction and interventions using small group or individual support.

Teachers and students will have access to Seesaw (K-6) and Edgenuity (7-12), both supplemental on-line resources providing additional opportunities for students to learn and interact with content. Both platforms offer formative assessments that provide real-time feedback to students.

For Students with IEPs, teachers and instructional aides will utilize any or all of the following: pair written instructions with oral instructions, provide a transcript of video instruction, provide written directions for assignments, write directions in short, bulleted format, support executive functioning deficits by helping students to keep a daily schedule, including scheduled breaks, planning and prioritizing tasks, organize learning management systems (i.e. Google Classroom) assignments and materials by topic, preview/review material with students via Zoom, utilize the accommodations/modifications listed in the IEP, utilize accessibility features according to student need (i.e., text-to-speech, increased font size, masking, etc.).

For English Learners, teachers and instructional aides will utilize any or all of the following: chunk content into small learning opportunities, daily opportunities to engage in all four language domains (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), preview academic vocabulary prior to main lesson, use live or recorded video lessons as an opportunity to continue to develop and assess speaking and listening skills., in preparing for instruction (in ELD or any content area) use instructional tools such as: PowerPoint presentations; videos; photos and Illustrations; sentence frames; whiteboards (via Zoom); realia (via items found around the home).

For foster and homeless youth, site administration will work with district office to continue to provide supplementary services. The site and/or district liaison will maintain on-going collaboration with key staff in the county welfare agency, mental health agency, county office of education foster youth services program, foster family agencies, and other placement providers, and other entities providing care and services to foster youth within the district. The district will continue to use funds allocated for academic supports and remediation, transportation, and costs and fees for scaffolding such as small group or one-on-one tutoring, mentoring, and parent education.

School Community Liaisons are available to contact parents, as needed, to explain and/or coordinate action steps for addressing individual student learning gaps.

Office hours will be used for one on one support.

Effectiveness of Implemented Pupil Learning Loss Strategies

[A description of how the effectiveness of the services or supports provided to address learning loss will be measured.]

Site administrators and counselors will work with teachers to collect and evaluate data on student progress.

Teachers will utilize both on-line assessment platforms (eg. textbook publisher platforms) as well as evaluation of actual student work (eg. writing assignments, math practice problems, projects, etc.) in order to obtain as much of an authentic understanding of student progress as possible. Effectiveness of services will be based on multiple measures rather than simply relying on on-line assessments.

Teachers, administrators and counselors will use the data to determine the effectiveness of interventions, both school wide and for individual students.

Actions to Address Pupil Learning Loss

[additional rows and actions may be added as necessary]

Description
Total Funds
Contributing
Software licenses to support distance and hybrid learning: Edgenuity, Seesaw, Zoom
$700,000
No
Teacher intervention using Extended Learning and Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) Personnel and supplies.
$4,000,000
Yes

Mental Health and Social and Emotional Well-Being

[A description of how the LEA will monitor and support mental health and social and emotional well-being of pupils and staff during the school year, including the professional development and resources that will be provided to pupils and staff to address trauma and other impacts of COVID-19 on the school community.]

GGUSD recognizes that the collective physical and emotional impact of COVID-19 has affected us all in some way or another. Even though we have been focused on supporting wellness and mental health for many years for students, families and staff, the impact of COVID-19 necessitates that we intensify our efforts to provide effective, evidenced-based prevention and interventions to ensure that the well-being of all our stakeholders are supported. As part of our response to COVID-19, GGUSD is prioritizing mental health as well as social and emotional well-being for our students, families and staff.

Student Supports

Tier 1 Support (For All Students)

GGUSD Start Strong. GGUSD Start Strong is a TK-12 Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) initiative that GGUSD created to provide evidenced-based classroom practices, a SEL toolkit and video messages specifically to support our students’ wellness. Start Strong provides teachers with activities they can do with their students to help build relationships as well as foster resiliency skills, whether students are distance learning or in-person. Start Strong training for teachers and school staff has been provided to ensure that all students will have the opportunity to learn vital SEL skills. GGUSD teachers and staff are prepared to recognize and respond to students who are struggling to cope. In addition, students are provided with clear expectations and communication strategies to guide them through stressful situations. The goal of Start Strong is to not only provide tools to cope with challenging situations but to create an underlying culture of respect and support.

Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS). Over the last several school years, GGUSD has created a system of proactively teaching students appropriate behavior expectations. PBIS is continuing as part of out response to COVID-19. PBIS is used to reinforce positive behavior in children at school and at home. The proactive approach establishes behavioral supports and school culture needed for all students in a school to achieve social, emotional and academic success. GGUSD is offering training for staff on how to modify PBIS activities for distance learning.

Mindfulness. Mindfulness has been shown to be beneficial in helping students cope and manage difficult emotions. In GGUSD, we have partnered with the Illumination Institute, a local non-profit, to provide an easy to use mindfulness-based curriculum. GGUSD has offered training to support teacher’s knowledge about mindfulness as well as how to use the mindfulness curriculum with their students.

Wellness Workshops. GGUSD is providing wellness workshops that promote understanding of different wellness topics for students. These wellness topics include things like healthy coping skills, understanding emotions, social justice, maintaining relationships, and much more. Students are introduced to these topics and allowed time to process and reflect on how they are able to use wellness skills to cope with difficult emotions or experiences.

GGUSD Wellness Toolkit. Providing resources and tools for students and parents is much more challenging during our response to COVID-19. Part of our solution to this challenge was to create a GGUSD Wellness Toolkit. The wellness toolkit has hundreds of resources that are easily accessible to students and parents. The toolkit also provides education around stressors related to COVID-19. The GGUSD Wellness Toolkit is located here: www.ggusd.us/wellness

Tier 2 Support (Students At-Risk)

School Based Mental Health. GGUSD currently offers robust school based mental health (SBMH) services for students. GGUSD has school social workers, social work associates, school psychologists and school counselors that support the GGUSD SBMH program. Additionally, GGUSD contracts with three community agencies that provide SBMH services. The SBMH services that are provided in GGUSD consist of individual and group mental health counseling, which are provided at no cost.

Wellness Check-ins. GGUSD provides support to any student that is referred for a wellness check-in. The wellness check-in is an initial meeting (in-person or online) with the student to see how we may be of the best support. School counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, school social worker associates and administers provide wellness check-ins for students. The check-ins are tailored to each student’s needs. A plan to continue to support the student’s wellbeing is created in collaboration with the student and family. Student wellness plans often include referrals to our SBMH program for ongoing support.

Care Solace. GGUSD recently partnered with Care Solace. Care Solace is a company that helps to connect students, families and staff with mental health services in our community. Care Solace operates a web-based platform, in which they are able to support by making referrals to mental health professionals in our community. Care Solace staffs their mental health referral line 24 hours per day, 7 days a week for students, families and staff.

Targeted Interventions and Supports. GGUSD schools offer a menu of targeted supports for students that focus on supporting wellness and mental health. Examples of the intervention and supports include: social skills groups, mentoring, conflict resolution groups, positive behavior check-ins, restorative practices, mindfulness, anger management, growth mindset and motivation.

Tier 3 Support (Additional Support for Students at High Risk)

Mental Health Crisis Support. Student’s that require crisis support have access to GGUSD’s school counselors, school psychologists and school social workers. Crisis support is provided on an as needed basis when a student is a threat to others or to him or herself. When crisis support is needed a student safety plan is created and additional resources at the Orange County Health care Agency are often consulted for support.

Support for Students with a Disability. GGUSD offers robust mental health supports for students with disabilities. The student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP) team discusses the need for additional mental health support on a case by case basis. There are many different mental health supports that are available for students with an IEP, with the most frequent being individual counseling. Along with school psychologists and school social workers, GGUSD partners with Western Youth Services to provide students with mental health services based on his or her IEP.

Community Partnerships. GGUSD partners with several community agencies to provide intensive mental health supports for students. The Orange County Health Care Agency’s Crisis Assessment Team support GGUSD when we have a student that is a threat to themselves or experiencing a psychiatric emergency.

Families

GGUSD Wellness Toolkit. Providing resources and tools for students and parents is much more challenging during our response to COVID-19. Part of our solution to this challenge was to create a GGUSD Wellness Toolkit. The wellness toolkit has hundreds of resources that are easily accessible to students and parents. The toolkit also provides education around stressors related to COVID-19. The GGUSD Wellness Toolkit is located here: www.ggusd.us/wellness

Choose Wellness Events. GGUSD began last school year and will be providing parents and students that focus on mental and emotional wellness. Families will be able to select several workshops led by experts from GGUSD and partner organizations. Some of the workshops include Suicide Prevention by Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services, Knowing Your Mental Health Benefits and Rights by Community Health Initiative of Orange County, Mental Health 101 by Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), Stress Reduction for Parents by Illumination Institute, and more.

Care Solace. GGUSD recently partnered with Care Solace. Care Solace is a company that helps to connect students, families and staff with mental health services in our community. Care Solace operates a web-based platform, in which they are able to support by making referrals to mental health professionals in our community. Care Solace staffs their mental health referral line 24 hours per day, 7 days a week for students, families and staff.

Parent Training Academies. Each school meets regularly with parents to promote positive relationships and collaborate on the home school connection that is required for student success. Many of the parent engagement events focus of mental health and wellbeing topics. Parents are encouraged to be active participants in these engagement events.

Staff

Site administrators and district supervisors have been asked to regularly check in with their employees to monitor well-being and provide guidance and assistance when necessary. The following services are available:

Employee Assistance Program. GGUSD offers, to all eligible staff, access to an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The EAP program includes up to 5 in person, phone or video consultations with licensed counselors for staff and eligible family members, per issue, per calendar year. Staff members can talk about anything that they may need support with including mental health and wellbeing concerns.

Care Solace. GGUSD recently partnered with Care Solace. Care Solace is a company that helps to connect students, families and staff with mental health services in our community. Care Solace operates a web-based platform, in which they are able to support by making referrals to mental health professionals in our community. Care Solace staffs their mental health referral line 24 hours per day, 7 days a week for students, families and staff.

Super Week Training offered numerous courses for staff to support students with social and emotional learning, incorporate mindfulness strategies to reduce stress for students and staff, support students' wellness through healing and building resiliency, and maintain mental health and self care for educators.

Pupil and Family Engagement and Outreach

[A description of pupil engagement and outreach, including the procedures for tiered reengagement strategies for pupils who are absent from distance learning and how the LEA will provide outreach to pupils and their parents or guardians, including in languages other than English, when pupils are not meeting compulsory education requirements, or if the LEA determines the pupil is not engaging in instruction and is at risk of learning loss.]

Teachers will monitor student participation in distance learning and completion of assignments, paying particular attention to students who are not progressing towards learning goals, not engaged, or are at-risk of learning loss.

Site administrators will monitor teacher lessons on essential learning through district suggested distance learning platforms. All administrators have access to teacher Google Classrooms and Zoom accounts so that they can access both live instruction and monitor student work.

Teaches will utilize Parent Square, Class Dojo, e-mail, phone, and Zoom to follow up with students and/or family as appropriate, highlighting those not participating in learning activities.

Where necessary due to language barriers, school bilingual community liaisons will contact parents on behalf of the teacher. If a site does not have bilingual liaisons or needs assistance beyond site capacity, administrators will contact district office for additional support.

Site administrators will be monitoring progress reports and grading to identify teachers and or students needing support.

Site administrators and counselors will monitor information (logs, spreadsheet etc.) about students who are at risk and/or not participating in distance learning and work with teachers to develop a plan to reach out to students and families. School bilingual community liaisons will be used as necessary.

Administrators will work with district office staff when support beyond the site are needed and/or when site attempts to engage/reengage students have not been successful.

With respect to Students with IEPs who are not making progress towards goals or who are not engaged, teachers and administrators will work with designated service providers and parents to determine what action steps are appropriate and how to execute the agreed upon plan.

Instructional Assistants will support student action plans by engaging with students in break-out sessions, providing follow-up support in small groups, responding to individual questions on posts or via email.

IBI staff will support student behaviors by participating in on-line learning activities. They can also reach out to families to provide strategies and support.

The district has developed a three- level response to implement in the event that a given student or family is non-responsive to a school's attempts to interact:

  • Level one: Teacher with the support form liaison as needed for translation will contact the parents using information provided in Aeries. If the parents are reached and agreed to participate, no further action is needed. If a parent is reached and is struggling with having the child participate or refuse to participate, then the school team should direct them to appropriate interventions. If the parents cannot be reached then principal and staff will continue to make contact by further calling emergency numbers, friends and family of students.
  • Level two: In the event that students still not participating after teacher intervention in level one, teachers will inform principal who becomes involved by contacting the parents. If contact was made, then principal and community liaison in primary language will work with parents to understand expectations and an academic/participation plan and intervention may be needed. If contact was not made, the student's name will be shared with the Office of Student Services for further outreach.
  • Level three: When student and family communication cannot be made, the Office of Student Services will outreach in writing to family, relatives, and friends. If contact was made, the Student Services team members will facilitate family communication with Principal, consider additional supports student might need to access distance learning, and establish a follow up plan in a week. If parents no longer resides at that address, Student Services will determine if the family has enrolled in another district and provide an update to the principal.

School Nutrition

[A description of how the LEA will provide nutritionally adequate meals for all pupils, including those students who are eligible for free or reduced-price meals, when pupils are participating in both in-person instruction and distance learning, as applicable.]

Garden Grove Unified School District’s Child Nutrition department will provide nutritionally adequate meals for all students using the Grab and Go Meal Program in both distance learning and in-person instruction. With the approved USDA waivers, these grab and go student meals are for consumption at home, including drive-through or curbside pick-up. Starting Monday, August 24 in a distance learning format, free breakfast and lunch meals will be served daily at 31 Grab and Go Meal sites to all registered students. Meals may be picked up by students, parents or guardians from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. A valid GGUSD student id must be presented and scanned to receive each meal.

Health and Safety procedures are updated including more frequently with hand washing, use of a cloth face or disposable covering by employees, frequent change of gloves, frequent sanitation of work stations, surfaces touched by students/parents during meal service including tables, POS scanner and maintaining physical distancing.

During meal preparation, disposable aprons, gloves, masks and other proper supplies are available for staff. Disposable trays and wrap are used for all meals. Employees work time is adjusted to minimize the number of staff in the kitchen.

Grab and Go Meal sites:

  1. Brookhurst Elementary, 9821 William Dalton Ave., Garden Grove 92841
  2. Excelsior Elementary, 10421 Woodbury Rd., Garden Grove 92843
  3. Gilbert Elementary, 9551 Orangewood, Garden Grove 92841
  4. Hazard Elementary, 4218 W. Hazard Ave., Santa Ana 92703
  5. Heritage Elementary, 426 S. Andres Pl., Santa Ana 92704
  6. Mitchell Elementary, 13451 Taft Ave., Garden Grove 92843
  7. Murdy Elementary, 14851 Donegal Dr., Garden Grove 92844
  8. Peters K-3 Elementary, 13162 Newhope St., Garden Grove 92843
  9. Riverdale Elementary, 13222 Lewis St., Garden Grove 92843
  10. Russell Elementary, 600 S. Jackson, Santa Ana 92704
  11. Stanford Elementary, 12721 Magnolia St., Garden Grove 92841
  12. Sunnyside Elementary, 9972 Russell Ave., Garden Grove 92844
  13. Wakeham Elementary, 7772 Chapman Ave., Garden Grove 92841
  14. Warren Elementary, 12871 Estock Dr., Garden Grove 92840
  15. Woodbury Elementary, 11362 Woodbury Rd., Garden Grove 92843
  16. Alamitos Intermediate, 12381 Dale., Garden Grove 92841
  17. Bell Intermediate, 12345 Springdale, Garden Grove 92845
  18. Doig Intermediate, 12752 Trask Ave., Garden Grove 92843
  19. Fitz Intermediate, 4600 McFadden, Santa Ana 92704
  20. Irvine Intermediate, 10552 Hazard Ave., Garden Grove 92843
  21. Jordan Intermediate, 9821 Woodbury Rd., Garden Grove 92844
  22. Lake Intermediate, 10801 Orangewood Ave., Garden Grove 92840
  23. McGarvin Intermediate, 9802 Bishop Pl., Westminster 92683
  24. Ralston Intermediate, 10851 Lampson Ave., Garden Grove 92840
  25. Walton Intermediate, 12181 Buaro St., Garden Grove 92840
  26. Bolsa Grande High, 9401 Westminster Ave., Garden Grove 92844
  27. Garden Grove High, 11271 Stanford Ave., Garden Grove 92840
  28. La Quinta High, 10372 McFadden Ave., Westminster 92683
  29. Los Amigos High, 16566 Newhope St., Fountain Valley 92708
  30. Rancho Alamitos High, 11351 Dale St., Garden Grove 92841
  31. Santiago High, 12342 Trask Ave., Garden Grove 92843

Information regarding school nutrition is also available on the District's webpage: http://gardengrove.healtheliving.net.

Additional Actions to Implement the Learning Continuity Plan

[additional rows and actions may be added as necessary]

Section Description
Total Funds
Contributing
Mental Health and Social and Emotional Well-Being To further support student, family and employee wellness, GGUSD recently partnered with Care Solace to increase access to mental health support and counseling. Care Solace, offers a free 24/7 concierge service to support GGUSD students, families, and staff through the process of finding individualized mental health support to meet each unique need. GGUSD school social workers will also provide support to our students and families.
$1,000,000
Yes
School Nutrition Repurposing of transportation services to assist with providing grab and go meal service. Food services employees also has a shift in duties to provide grab and go meal services.
$2,500,000
No
Stakeholder Engagement Upgrade of Zoom to Premium Service (3,000 participant) to facilitate larger group meetings, especially in the area of increased parent engagement. This also includes working with contractors to assist with parent surveys and reopening planning.
$108,900
Yes
Distance Learning Program (Access to Devices and Connectivity) Purchase of FastBridge Software to support MTSS (Multi-Tiered Systems of Support) to support implementation of student assessment and interventions.
$36,703
Yes
Pupil Engagement and Outreach Expanded learning programs (TK-6) are being provided at several district school sites, principally directed to support low-income families in the community.
$2,600,000
Yes
School Nutrition Purchase additional supplies and equipment that required to provide grab and go meal service.
$500,000
No
Distance Learning Program Purchase of software licenses to facilitate virtual graduations.
$100,000
No
Distance Learning Program Purchase of electronic signature contract districtwide to support work from home plans and virtual meetings with parents.
$400,000
No
Distance Learning Program Leasing of buses for the purposes of delivering meals to the 31 grab and go child nutrition program as well as providing wi-fi connectivity in targeted neighborhoods.
$500,000
No

Increased or Improved Services for Foster Youth, English Learners, and Low-Income Students

Percentage to Increase or Improve Services Increased Apportionment based on the Enrollment of Foster Youth, English Learners, and Low-Income students
75.58% $89,396,563

Required Descriptions

[For the actions being provided to an entire school, or across the entire school district or county office of education (COE), an explanation of (1)how the needs of foster youth, English learners, and low-income students were considered first, and (2) how these actions are effective in meeting the needs of these students.]

Prior to the district collecting family surveys regarding family and student needs and preferences, the district began distributing devices and mobile hotspots to any family/student that requested them. While these services were available to all students, this opportunity was principally directed to low income families who most likely did not have access to the technology students would need to complete their coursework as well as for parents and students to be able to communicate effectively and efficiently with school and district personnel.

In cases where having a device and a mobile hotspot still did/do not meet the needs of students with respect to completing coursework, services principally directed to low income families include arrangements with their child's school site to provide hard copy packets. Site administrators work with teachers to provide these materials and coordinate with families to pick up and return the packets. By providing hard copy packets to students they are not dependent upon either knowledge/skill on a device or mobile hot spot integrity. Some students (and parents) from low income families have less exposure to at-home technology and may find it additionally challenging to complete content assignments on an on-line platform. Packets allow students to focus on the content as they continue to build their device skills.

Embedded within the pacing addenda for each core content course, strategies, scaffolds, and resources principally directed to English Learners were called out. In some cases the scaffolds and resources are part of the textbook publisher program but were highlighted and/or hyperlinked, in other cases they are strategies from the District adopted Constructing Meaning and/or Systematic ELD initiatives.

When schools transitioned last March to distance learning, the district's designated foster youth liaison worked with foster families and Orangewood Children's Foundation to ensure that students in foster care had all of the technology resources and/or school supplies that they would need to be successful in this new learning format. School counselors and administrators continue to closely monitor the academic progress and socio-emotional wellbeing of foster youth at their site, considering the unique emotional challenges these students face. Counselors and administration maintain contact with the students themselves, and if necessary can make a referral to the district program specialists in Student Services for additional support.

[A description of how services for foster youth, English learners, and low-income students are being increased or improved by the percentage required.]

The Garden Grove Unified School District (GGUSD) Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) from 2019-20 was designed to meet the needs of all students, including additional actions/services to support the unduplicated student population (educationally disadvantaged youth). The GGUSD LCAP from 2019-20 was organized through the lens of our District’s Strategic Plan goals -- Goal 1: Academic Skills, Goal 2: Personal Skills, and Goal 3: Lifelong Success. The LCAP from 2019-20 described the actions and services supporting these goals. Increased and improved services specifically supporting English Learners and Foster Youth were described in the LCAP from 2019-20 through Goal 1, Actions 1B(1) through IB(5), and Goal 1, Action 1A(7). Actions/Services targeting Low Income Youth are designated in the plan throughout, providing academic support, personal skills development, and improved college/career outcome measures.

GGUSD plans to maintain the goals outlined in the LCAP from 2019-20 and build upon our successes through continued investment in teacher professional development and support, instructional support personnel, student intervention and support programs, and parent engagement opportunities, all which have been validated through the feedback received through the latest annual Strategic Plan surveys.

LCFF/LCAP

What is the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF)?

California’s 2013-14 Budget Act included landmark legislation that changes the state’s school finance system. The changes introduced by the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) represent a major shift in how California funds our school district. For nearly 40 years, California has relied on a system that included general purpose funding (known as revenue limits) and more than 50 tightly defined categorical programs. Under LCFF, California funds school districts, charter schools, and county offices of education equally per student with adjustments based on grade levels and demographic characteristics. This includes a provision for supplemental and concentration funds granted to support districts with higher numbers of students with academic need (English learners, low-income, and foster youth). LCFF replaces complexity in favor of equity, transparency, and performance.

What is the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP)?

The Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) is an important component of the LCFF. The school district will develop, adopt, and annually update a three-year plan. Pursuant to Education Code section 52060, the LCAP must describe, for the school district and each school within the district, goals and specific actions to achieve those goals for all pupils and each subgroup of pupils identified in Education Code section 52052, for each of the state priorities and any locally identified priorities. Engagement of parents, pupils, and other stakeholders is a critical component of the planning process. The school district will also consult with teachers, principals, administrators, other school personnel, and local bargaining units of the school district in the development of the LCAP.

Eight State Priorities

The eight priorities for the LCAP have been grouped into three broad categories: a) Conditions of Learning, b) Pupil Outcomes, and c) Parent and Student Engagement.

A. Conditions of Learning:

Basic Conditions: degree to which teachers are appropriately assigned pursuant to Education Code section 44258.9, and fully credentialed in the subject areas and for the pupils they are teaching; pupils have access to standards-aligned instructional materials pursuant to Education Code section 60119; and school facilities are maintained in good repair pursuant to Education Code section 17002(d). (Priority 1)

Implementation of State Standards: implementation of academic content and performance standards adopted by the state board for all pupils, including English learners. (Priority 2)

Course access: pupil enrollment in a broad course of study that includes all of the subject areas described in Education Code section 51210 and subdivisions (a) to (i), inclusive, of Section 51220, as applicable. (Priority 7)

Expelled pupils (for county offices of education only): coordination of instruction of expelled pupils pursuant to Education Code section 48926. (Priority 9)

Foster youth (for county offices of education only): coordination of services, including working with the county child welfare agency to share information, responding to the needs of the juvenile court system, and ensuring transfer of health and education records. (Priority 10)

B. Pupil Outcomes:

Pupil achievement: performance on standardized tests, score on Academic Performance Index, share of pupils that are college and career ready, share of English learners that become English proficient, English learner reclassification rate, share of pupils that pass Advanced Placement exams with 3 or higher, share of pupils determined prepared for college by the Early Assessment Program. (Priority 4)

Other pupil outcomes: pupil outcomes in the subject areas described in Education Code section 51210 and subdivisions (a) to (i), inclusive, of Education Code section 51220, as applicable. (Priority 8)

C. Parent and Student Engagement:

Parent involvement: efforts to seek parent input in decision making, promotion of parent participation in programs for unduplicated pupils and special need subgroups. (Priority 3)

Pupil engagement: school attendance rates, chronic absenteeism rates, middle school dropout rates, high school dropout rates, high school graduations rates. (Priority 5)

School climate: pupil suspension rates, pupil expulsion rates, other local measures including surveys of pupils, parents and teachers on the sense of safety and school connectedness. (Priority 6)

Resources

Learn more about LCFF including frequently asked questions.

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